Nutrition Management Services Company

Arbutus Park Manor Bakes with Cooks from NMSC!

Posted by Michele Metz on Thu, Aug 29, 2013 @ 19:08 PM

We are happy to share a little fun we had with our residents at Arbutus Park Manor.  Please enjoy a little collage of photos that we made just for you of food preparation from our staff appreciation day and our residents baking with our cooks continuing to create community!ArbutusLaborDay resized 600

Topics: Elder Care, Nutrition Management Services Company, Community, bake from scratch, Labor Day

Community Annual Resident and Family Picnic Fun with NMSC!

Posted by Michele Metz on Fri, Jul 19, 2013 @ 12:07 PM

Nutrition Management Services Company is proud to present:
describe the image

Topics: Elder Care, Nutrition Management Services Company, Community, family, picnic

Happy Healthy Independence Day, Keeping Our Residents Informed!

Posted by Michele Metz on Tue, Jul 9, 2013 @ 20:07 PM

Buddy Roth, Food Service Director at Arbutus Park Retirement Community was the featured speaker at the Cottager Dinner on July 1st for current residents.  He spoke about all the great things that our department contributes, our long term tenure with the manor and the corporate support provided, our meal service program, the continuing education we provide our staff, the dining concept, purchasing/vendors and fiscal responsibility, some basic clinical information/responsibilities, and the challenges we face in the department.  He also reviewed some of the fun things we do for residents and opened it up for questions afterward.  It’s so nice to include our residents in discussions about their nutrition! 

 photo resized 600

Independent thinking means smart living, thank you Buddy!  On Independence Day and through July this year, lets declare that nutrition be the priority and the topic of discussion.  Community events and functions are a wonderful way to connect and celebrate.  We hope everyone had a happy, safe and healthy 4th of July!

-Your friends at NMSC

Topics: Healthy, Nutrition, Independence Day, Fourth of July, residents, happy, connect, staff

Bake from scratch like NMSC chefs!

Posted by Michele Metz on Fri, May 24, 2013 @ 13:05 PM

 While remembering loved ones this weekend, you might be inclined to have family functions and cook for the start of the summer season!  We bake from scratch at NMSC, so our team has a lot of tips to share.  Here is a handy dandy conversion chart…in case you haven’t cleaned out the cupboards and only have a dropper when you need a teaspoon.  This dilemma is quite common…or maybe not, but I had fun with the word “pint”.  Would anyone fancy a pint…I mean 2 cups…I mean 16 fluid ounces?  Test your kids!  See if you are smarter than a fifth grader! 

Common Measurements and Equivalents

½ tsp   =          30 drops

1 tsp    =          1/3 TBS or 60 drops

3 tsp    =          1 tablespoon

½ TBS =          1 ½ tsps

1 TBS  =          3 tsps or ½ fluid ounce

2 TBS  =          1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce

3 TBS  =          1 ½ fluid ounces or 1 jigger

4TBS   =          ¼ cup or 2 fluid ounces

5 1/3 TBS=      1/3 cup or 5 TBS + 1 tsp

8 TBS =          ½ cup or 4 fluid ounces

12 TBS =         ¾ cup or 6 fluid ounces

16 TBS =         1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or ½ pint

1/8 cup =         2 TBS or 1 Fluid ounce

¼ cup =           4 TBS or 2 Fluid ounces

1/3 cup =         5 TBS + 1 tsp

½ cup =           8 TBS or 4 fluid ounces

2/3 cup =         10 TBS plus 2 tsp

5/8 cup =         ½ cup + 2 TBS

¾ cup =           12 TBS or 6 fluid ounces

7/8 cup =         ¾ cup + 2 TBS

1 cup =            16 TBS or ½ pint or 8 fluid ounces

2 cups =           1 pint or 16 fluid ounces

1 pint =            2 cups or 16 fluid ounces

1 quart =          2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces

1 gallon =        4 quarts 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces

 

Happy Memorial Day Weekend Everybody!

- From all your friends at Nutrition Management Services Company

Topics: Nutrition, Nutrition Management Services Company, Memorial Day, measurement conversion chart, cook, cups, pint, ounces, bake from scratch, chef

Everyday Eating for a Healthier You

Posted by Michele Eckbold on Thu, Mar 7, 2013 @ 15:03 PM

healthyplate

The 2010 newly released Dietary Guidelines for Americans offers a practical roadmap to help you make changes in your eating plan to improve your health.

Balancing Calories to Manage Weight

The first step is to focus on balancing calories with physical activity and consuming an overall healthy eating pattern. This will put you on the road to achieving or maintaining a healthy weight and reducing the risk of developing diet-related chronic diseases.

The Dietary Guidelines recommend shifting eating patterns to eat more of some foods and nutrients and less of others. A healthy eating pattern will allow you to meet the recommendations while staying within your calorie needs.

Foods and Nutrients to Increase

The Dietary Guidelines encourage Americans to eat more:

  • Whole grains: Increase whole grains by choosing whole grain breads and cereals, brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Make at least half your grain servings whole grains.

  • Vegetables: Eat a variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red and orange vegetables plus beans and peas. Most adults need 2 ½ cups of vegetables per day.

  • Fruits: Add fruit to meals and snacks—fresh, frozen or canned—to get about  2 cups each day.

  • Low-fat or fat free milk, yogurt and cheese or fortified soy beverages: Include 3 cups per day for calcium, vitamin D, protein and potassium. Lactose-free milk is also an option.

  • Vegetable oils such as canola, corn, olive, peanut and soybean: These are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Use in moderate amounts in place of solid fats.

  • Seafood: Include a variety of seafood more often in place of some meat and poultry.

Foods and Food Components to Reduce
More than one-third of all calories consumed by Americans are solid fats and added sugars.  More than one-third of all calories consumed by Americans are solid fats and added sugars.  The 2010 Dietary Guidelines recommend eating less:

• Added sugars

• Solid fats, including trans fats

• Refined grains

• Sodium

Sodium

The recommendation for sodium remains the same—no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium—for most people. However, a reduction to 1,500 milligrams per day is recommended for people over age 51, African-Americans and those with a history of high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease and diabetes.

Suggestions for reducing sodium:

• Prepare food using little salt or fewer high-sodium ingredients. For example, skip using salt in cooking pasta, rice, cereals and vegetables.

• Taste food before salting it. Lightly salt food only as needed, not as a habit.

• Eat fresh fruits and vegetables which are naturally low in sodium

• Use herbs, spice rubs and fruit juices in cooking in place of salt.

• Check food labels comparing like items and choose lower sodium foods. Also watch for terms like “low sodium” and “no added salt.”

• Eat fresh, lean meats, poultry, fish, dry and fresh beans and peas, unsalted nuts and eggs, all of which contain less sodium.

Fats

For optimal health, most people should reduce their intake of solid fats and trans fat by replacing them with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Solid fats are found in fatty animal-based foods such as well-marbled meat, poultry skin, bacon, sausage, butter and whole milk products. Trans fat is found in foods made with vegetable oils that have been partially hydrogenated such as cookies, donuts, pastries and crackers.

Most fats should be polyunsaturated or monounsaturated such as liquid vegetable oils like canola, olive, corn, peanut and soybean. Plant-based foods like nuts, seeds, olives and avocados also contain these healthy fats.

Eating Right with MyPlate

Get a personalized eating plan at www.choosemyplate.gov. Your MyPlate Plan will give you the amounts of each food group you need daily. If you have special dietary needs, consult a registered dietitian for a customized plan.

 

 

Original article authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitians.

Topics: Fruits, Vegetables, Healthy, Diets, Nutrition

Understanding Body Mass Index

Posted by Michele Eckbold on Wed, Mar 6, 2013 @ 18:03 PM

bmibannerBMI stands for Body Mass Index. It is important to know what your BMI does and does not indicate about your weight, health and lifestyle choices. Your BMI is calculated from your height and weight. It is a fairly reliable indicator of body fat for most adults, with athletes and the elderly being two exceptions. BMI is an inexpensive alternative to direct measurements of body fat, such as underwater weighing, but it is only one of many factors that you and your health-care provider should use in evaluating your health status.

Calculating Your BMI

You can calculate your BMI with this formula: weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches) x height (in inches)] x 703 or use the Academy BMI calculator.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses BMI to define terms like overweight and obese:

  • Underweight: BMI below 18.5

  • Normal weight: 18.5 to 24.9

  • Overweight: 25.0 to 29.9

  • Obese: 30.0 and above.

BMI and Your Health

People with very low or very high BMIs tend to have the greatest health risks. Even so, BMI is only one factor in your overall health. For example, if your BMI falls into the normal weight category, you will still have a higher risk of health problems if you:

  • Smoke cigarettes

  • Do not participate in regular physical activity

  • Eat lots of nutrient-poor foods with added fat and sugar.

If your BMI is in the overweight category, you will have a lower overall health risk if you:

  • Get regular physical activity

  • Have blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels that are within normal limits.

This means BMI is one aspect of your health to discuss with your care provider. Together, you can decide if other assessments need to be done and whether lifestyle changes such as eating smarter and moving more will improve your health.

BMI Measurements in Children and Teens

While BMI calculations for children and teens use the same formula as adults, criteria used to define obesity and overweight are different for young people because of factors like body fat differences between boys and girls and variations in body fat at different ages. Visit the BMI Percentile Calculator for Child and Teen to determine your child's BMI.



Article courtesy: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Topics: Healthy, Nutrition

31 Days of Healthy Living

Posted by Michele Eckbold on Tue, Mar 5, 2013 @ 14:03 PM

healthylivingIn honor of National Nutrition Month we are sharing 31 easy and important tips to ensure you're living a healthy and nutritious life-style. http://bit.ly/31DaysofHealth

Continue to check back for daily tips. Feel free to share your experiences and information while participating in the 31 Days of Healthy Living on our blog, Facebook and Twitter.

Topics: Fruits, Vegetables, Healthy, Diets, Nutrition

13 Healthy Tips for 2013

Posted by Michele Eckbold on Mon, Mar 4, 2013 @ 14:03 PM

Nutrition Month 2013

The 2013 National Nutrition Month theme is "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day."  The focus of this month is nutrition education and information focused attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. Click here to read 13 simple tips to live a healthier life in 2013: http://bit.ly/13_tips

Topics: Fruits, Vegetables, Healthy, Diets, Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month!

Posted by Michele Eckbold on Fri, Mar 1, 2013 @ 16:03 PM

describe the imageIt is officially National Nutrition Month.  Our Registered Dieticians and amazing staff are here to provide support to you every day. Kick off the month with a little fact or fiction quiz to see just how much you know at http://bit.ly/MythorFact. And remember to check back daily for updates, resources and fun facts.

Topics: Healthy, Nutrition

Great infographic showing when your favorite fruits & vegetables are in season!

Posted by Brian Fioravanti on Fri, Sep 7, 2012 @ 17:09 PM

Great infographic showing when the fruits and vegetables you love are in season and at the peak of their flavor!

 

3ekdu resized 600

Source: CUESA 

Why eat more fruits and vegetables?

  • Healthy diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.
  • Fruits and vegetables also provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that are important for good health.
  • Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and are filling.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Topics: Fruits, Vegetables, Healthy, Diets, Nutrition